Posts Tagged ‘NaNoWriMo’

First off, I’m so excited that io9 has posted the first glimpse of Rachel Caine’s wonderful trailer for her even more amazing book PRINCE OF SHADOWS, coming in February 2014, but available now for preorder.

princeofshadows_lores

A thrilling retelling of the star-crossed tale of Romeo and Juliet, from the New York Times bestselling author of the Morganville Vampires series.

In the Houses of Montague and Capulet, there is only one goal: power. The boys are born to fight and die for honor and—if they survive—marry for influence and money, not love. The girls are assets, to be spent wisely. Their wishes are of no import. Their fates are written on the day they are born.

Benvolio Montague, cousin to Romeo, knows all this. He expects to die for his cousin, for his house, but a spark of rebellion still lives inside him. At night, he is the Prince of Shadows, the greatest thief in Verona—and he risks all as he steals from House Capulet. In doing so, he sets eyes on convent-bound Rosaline, and a terrible curse begins that will claim the lives of many in Verona…

…And will rewrite all their fates, forever.

 

In other news, as kind of a part II to our NaNoWriMo tips of last week, Amy Christine Parker and I did our video for YA Rebels this week on the revision process.  I might brandish a sword.  (Not well, mind you, but still.)

First, three crazy-exciting new releases today: DAYLIGHTERS by Rachel Caine, the culmination of her Morganville Vampires series (15 books and all awesome – how does she do it?), a fabulous fantasy debut, THE GOLDEN CITY by J. Kathleen Cheney and TO DANCE WITH THE DEVIL, the latest Blood Singer novel from Cat Adams Here’s a little bit about each:

daylighters DAYLIGHTERS by Rachel Caine (hardcover and digital from Penguin)

(Amazon, B&N, Books-a-Million, Indiebound)

While Morganville, Texas, is often a troubled town, Claire Danvers and her friends are looking forward to coming home. But the Morganville they return to isn’t the one they know; it’s become a different place—a deadly one…

Something drastic has happened in Morganville while Claire and her friends were away. The town looks cleaner and happier than they’ve ever seen it before, but when their incoming group is arrested and separated—vampires from humans—they realize that the changes definitely aren’t for the better.

It seems that an organization called the Daylight Foundation has offered the population of Morganville something they’ve never had: hope of a vampire-free future. And while it sounds like salvation—even for the vampires themselves—the truth is far more sinister and deadly.

Now, Claire, Shane and Eve need to find a way to break their friends out of Daylighter custody, before the vampires of Morganville meet their untimely end…

goldencity_100dpi THE GOLDEN CITY by J. Kathleen Cheney (trade paperback and digital from Roc Books)

(Amazon, B&N, Books-a-Million, Indiebound)

For two years, Oriana Paredes has been a spy among the social elite of the Golden City, reporting back to her people, the sereia, sea folk banned from the city’s shores….

When her employer and only confidante decides to elope, Oriana agrees to accompany her to Paris. But before they can depart, the two women are abducted and left to drown. Trapped beneath the waves, Oriana’s heritage allows her to survive while she is forced to watch her only friend die.

Vowing vengeance, Oriana crosses paths with Duilio Ferreira—a police consultant who has been investigating the disappearance of a string of servants from the city’s wealthiest homes. Duilio also has a secret: He is a seer and his gifts have led him to Oriana.

Bound by their secrets, not trusting each other completely yet having no choice but to work together, Oriana and Duilio must expose a twisted plot of magic so dark that it could cause the very fabric of history to come undone….

to dance with the devil TO DANCE WITH THE DEVIL by Cat Adams (Tor Books)

(Amazon, B&N, Books-a-Million, Indiebound)

In To Dance with the Devil, the latest entry in Cat Adams’s Blood Singer series, Celia Graves’s newest client is one of the last surviving members of a magical family that is trapped in a generations-old feud with other magic-workers. She’s supposed to die at the next full moon unless Celia can broker peace between the clans or break the curse before it can take effect.

For the first time in a long while, Celia’s personal life is looking up. Her vampire abilities seem to be under control, her Siren abilities have gotten more reliable, and even though her office was blown up, her services are more in demand than ever now that she’s fought off terrorists and been part of the royal wedding of the year. Her friends all seem to be finding love and her grandmother has—finally—agreed to go to family therapy.

The only trouble spot is Celia’s love life. Not long ago, she had two boyfriends. Now she barely has one and she isn’t sure she wants him. But Bruno DeLuca is a powerful mage and Celia needs his help…especially after she’s attacked and her client is kidnapped.

In other news, Amy Christine Parker and I have our latest YA Rebels video up today with NaNoWriMo Tips.  Check it out!

In case anyone’s wondering – yes, the disembodied voice on tip #10 is that of my husband!

Lots of great NaNoWriMo advice floating around Twitter, much of it revolving around the truism that once you finish those 50,000 words (or however much you’ve been able to accomplish), you have not =finished= the book.  First, 50,000 words is often too short to be considered a novel, depending on the age group for which you’re writing.  Second, a novel is so much more than a first draft.  I’m asked all the time, “I’ve finished my novel.  Now what?”  My response is always to find a critique partner or group and workshop/revise the heck out of it.  I suggest critiquing because often we’re too close to our own work to see it’s flaws.  We know what we meant, so we don’t necessarily know when we’ve been unclear.  We won’t always call ourselves on the tough stuff or even see that there’s something we’ve shied away from until someone points it out.  Once we know, we can’t unknow.  Oh, we can do denial, but that’s never helped anyone deal with the problems at hand.  That’s not to say that all criticism will be useful.  You do have to run it all through your own filters, but listen with an open mind and approach the manuscript with the attitude that you’re going to take the time and expend the effort needed to make it not just acceptable, but sensational.  Not just done, but done right.

Now, the above is not a lead in to my next note.  I don’t think you have to pay for critiques necessarily.  However, Publishing for Vision & Hearing is holding an auction to raise money for the Foundation Fighting Blindness and the Deafness Research Foundation.  Many great authors, editors and agents (including me) have donated critiques to benefit these great causes.  So, if you’re so inclined, stop by and see if you want to place a bid or help us spread the word.